Sunday, June 15, 2014

Switch pitchers recruited to play in college


Do ambidextrous pitchers get recruited to play in college?

Yes, a few ambidextrous pitchers played in college up to the Division I level. 


Two switch pitchers played for Harvard University in the Ivy League.

Switch pitcher Pat Venditte initially was a walk-on at Creighton University, but was later offered a scholarship to play college ball. Alex Trautner is the latest college recruit as a switch pitcher for the Blue Jays.

A few ambidextrous pitchers have been recruited to play for the top college teams in the country...


Recent college recruits

Alex Trautner, a switch pitcher from San Ramon Valley HS in Danville, CA will be pitching  for the Creighton University Bluejays in 2015.  

Aubrey McCarty, a switch pitcher from Georgia is playing for Vanderbilt University under coach Tim Corbin. Vanderbilt plays in the SEC and won the College World Series in 2014.

Ryan Perez, an ambidextrous player from Illinois, can throw 90 mph with both arms. Perez switch pitches for Judson University. In high school he was also a switch hitter with power. 

Andrew Pullin from Washington, was recruited to play baseball for the University of Oregon, but in 2012 he was drafted in the fifth round by the Philadelphia Phillies. Pullin now plays in the minor leagues.

Drew Vettleson, a top prospect from Washington, was recruited to play for Oregon State University, but opted to sign with the Tampa Bay Rays in 2010. Vettleson is moving up the ranks as an outfielder in the minor leagues.


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See a list of switch pitchers who played in college >>


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The Recruiting Timeline


This is a general layout of the schedule or "time line" that a high school baseball player can follow, in an effort to play baseball at the college level. 


College Baseball Recruiting Tips

It's important to start early if you are thinking about playing in college. Attend college games and camps to get exposure to college baseball. Top baseball players are selected by colleges during their junior year of high school. Focus on academics, developing skills, training hard and being a good teammate. 


Evaluating the Potential College Pitcher

By Rob Smith

When evaluating the potential college pitcher you have to consider several different factors in determining what it is you are looking for. How does the hitter react to the ball? Is he able to command the baseball? Has he showed a legitimate second or third pitch? What is his future in regards to health and injury? What is his velocity? All of these types of questions are raised when evaluating a pitching prospect for your program. When I am recruiting a pitcher I will break him down in five different areas; Mechanics, Stuff, Command, Velocity, and Intangibles. 


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